Media companies begin appeal of N.J. public records ruling

UPDATE (9/10/2016):  See bottom of post. — The pivotal question of whether or not a public agency can respond to a request for records by neither confirming nor denying that they exist is before the NJ Appellate Division. -NJFOG NorthJersey.com Nov. Continue Reading →

TUESDAY, JUNE 23: OPMA, OPRA reform bills S781, S782 on legislative agenda!

UPDATE (6/24/15):  The bills were pulled from the Committee agenda on 6/23.  Your calls and letters are needed!  Please see:  http://njfog.org/2015/06/24/letter-generator-one-easy-step-for-strong-opma-opra-reform-lets-keep-the-pressure-on/ — New Jersey OPMA and OPRA reform bills, S781 and S782 respectively, are on the Senate Budget and Appropriations Continue Reading →

N.J. Senate approves changes to Port Authority public records bill

UPDATE (6/29/2015):   The governor signed the bill on June 29.  It is now law, effective upon signing. UPDATE (6/26/2015):   S2183 passed through both houses of the Legislature on June 25, 2015.  It now heads back to the Governor!   Read Continue Reading →

NOW ONLINE: The Delaware River Port Authority’s open records policy, request form and officer

The Delaware River Port Authority (DRPA) now has on its website the basic information needed to request public records from the agency. On March 24, NJFOG officer John Paff sent DRPA an email describing problems with the records request procedure Continue Reading →

South Orange Strikes Down Proposed ‘Open Governance’ Ordinance

NJFOG is a bit behind on posting this story, which was reported in mid-April. It is worth reading. Kudos to South Orange Village President Alex Torpey for his efforts to promote open, transparent, accountable government. – NJFOG  Alex Torpey The Village Continue Reading →

Delaware River Port Authority records now a bit more accessible

On March 27, we reported that NJFOG trustee John Paff had researched the process for requesting public records from the Delaware River Port Authority (DRPA) – which is not subject to OPRA – and found almost comical shortcomings, including requirements Continue Reading →